Posts Tagged ‘Dietitian’

Found a list of Dietetic Internships: for International Food, Nutrition and Dietetics Professionals

Nutrition

Here is a reference for dietetics professionals that describes Didactic, Coordinated, Dietetic Technician, Dietetic Internships and other programs that have international collaborations with over 50 foreign locations. Made possible through the Wimpfheimer-Guggenheim Fund for International Exchange in Nutrition, Dietetics and Management…

Click here for the download page

Dietitians and Nutritionists : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Cover of the 2006-2007 Occupational Outlook Ha...

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: Occupational Outlook Handbook (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A good link for seeing the potential in this field from the government’s perspective i.e. “Employment of dietitians and nutritionists is expected to increase 20 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations.”

Click here for:  Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics on Dietitians and Nutritionists.

Cough and Oral Hygeine videos (things most people never think to do…but are good ideas). #nutrition, #health coach, #dietitian

242:365 - Used Up

Good Cough and Oral hygiene videos (things most people never think to do…but are all good ideas).

To dietitians… passing this link to your corporate clients may be something their HR department is looking for. Good for building your relationship and credibility.

Click here for Cough and Oral Hygiene Videos

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Unrelated To lighten things up…

BROCHURE: Prostate Cancer What You Should Know

To Dietitians:  Consider giving this brochure to your clients to educate them on Prostate Cancer, the causes and symptoms, and how it can be treated.  Also, the role nutrition can play in avoiding cancer altogether.

Prostate and bladder, sagittal section. 中文: 前列...

Prostate and bladder, sagittal section. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Click here for Brochure on Prostate Cancer What You Should Know

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Unrelated To lighten things up…

Twitter Tips for Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists

Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...

Ideas For Dietitians and Nutritionists

TO:  Registered Dietitians:  How much can you say in 140 characters?  A lot — and often.  Just ask the millions of Twitter users worldwide.

Large and small consulting practices: such as Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists are aggressively growing their Twitter presence to communicate directly with their current clients, alliance partners, investors, employees and potential clients.

In response, Dietitians are creating profiles that showcase their expertise, opinions and character:  to attract relationships with potential alliance partners, clients, industry gurus, etc.

Not too late to start:  If you’ve been tweeting since the early days of Twitter, congratulations — you have cultivated a substantial digital asset for yourself. If you’re just starting out or you’ve abandoned your account, the good news is that it’s never too late to start.

The best day to begin (again) is today. Twitter is forgiving like that. Here’s how to get going and stay going:

1. Set up your account. Twitter profiles are very simple to create and update. The essential elements are:

  • @name: Select a name for your account that’s distinct and professional. If possible, use some form of your real name.
  • Image: Post an image that is a clean and appropriate — a quality headshot, an artistic avatar, a logo or an image that suits your line of business. Do not use the generic Twitter image.
  • Description: Write a 160-character overview of who you are and what you tweet about. Most professionals list their role, or company, and then what they are passionate about as space permits.  The passionate part is what your audience will sense and remember.
  • Background Design: Choose a background design and image that complements your stated profile. Twitter supplies templates in the Design section of your account page and there are paid Twitter background apps available on the Internet with a wide variety of selection and price.  Typically the more expensive a product or service…the more conservative you will want to be.  A conservative image enhances first impressions and trust…especially in today’s hyper competitive markets.

2. Go mobile. Be prepared to participate by downloading the mobile version of Twitter. The platform is best enjoyed and maximized on the go. Twitter is available for iPhone, Android, and Blackberry users on their respective app stores. The functionality is incredibly good on mobile and easily recognizable from the desktop version. Many find Twitter to have transformed networking at trade shows and conferences with its simplicity of finding people, getting session feeds and tracking down event locations.

3. Give to get and learn the lingo. Twitter enables and encourages you to interact — it has distinct terminology and functionality. The sooner you learn the lingo the sooner you can reap benefits. In your initial days and weeks of engagement, focus on mastering the technology and publishing roughly 1 to 3 tweets daily.  Very important is:  you MUST provide value in every tweet.  This is especially important when using Twitter in your professional marketing efforts.  Remember that every communication…via any format (Twitter, email, in-person, etc.) is like an interview…your audience is always evaluating your potential “value add” to them…for their current or future initiatives.

Some Twitter Terminology:

Twitter terms definitions

Tip:  The best tweet content for earning new clients for your nutrition practice are those which demonstrate your knowledge and skills.  Use hashtags (#) before keywords to identify the subject matter or important aspects of your message that may not be used in the words in your tweet.  For example, if you’re offering tips on when to consult with a nutritionist, you can use the hashtags #nutrition and #allergy and #dietitian. That way, if others are searching for tweets about nutrition, they can find your tweet.

4. Focus on Your Target Market. Beyond tweeting with hashtags, your next priority is to wisely select followers to grab their attention. For example, if you are trying to gain corporate clients… i.e. to provide “Lunch and Learn” Nutrition Seminars to the employees (prospective clients) of the large firms in your area…then target HR managers and Corporate Communication managers that tweet about the company’s committment to their employees, community, what’s happening at the company, and industry trends. Use their tweets to learn their potential needs and to be relevant.  Learn about their corporate culture.  Read their tweets, list or favorite them, and retweet their most relevant tweets.  Help them.  If they follow you back, you then have the opportunity to send them a Direct Message of 140 characters. Learn to introduce yourself and ask for what you want (the value you can provide) succinctly.

5. Know the Etiquette. In your first level of proficiency with Twitter, keep these rules in mind:

  1. Remember that tweets live forever and are spread at the speed of light.
  2. Don’t hog your knowledge — Twitter demands sharing and interaction.
  3. Balance the quantity and quality of your tweets.
  4. “Follow back” someone who follows you as appropriate.
  5. Participate in real-time to get real results.

Best wishes for your success.

John Hudson   About

My new BOOK: “Nutrition and Wellness” Provides Information Your Clients Can Use To Take Charge of Their Health and Body

A diet rich in soy and whey protein, found in ...

BOOK: Nutrition and Wellness: Information You Can Use To Take Charge of Your Health and Body by Celeste Hudson, MBA, PhD

Nutrition and Wellness: Information You Can Use To Take Charge of Your Health and Body (35 pages) by Celeste Hudson, MBA, PhD

This book is A Basic Educational Session to provide information you can use to take charge of your own health and body. Discussion includes: Nutrition Labels Explained, Diet Tips, Healthy Food Choices, Carcinogens, Food and Chemical Effects.

Click here for this book

Example of how a successful nutrionist sets up her practice, and services offered…

Nutrition

Example of how nutritionists set up successful practices

To give Registered Dietitians an example of how a successful nutrionist sets up her practice, and what services she offers…see the following link:

SERVICES THEY OFFER:

Nutritional Consultations

  • A private consultation to establish nutritional goals, evaluate behavior patterns and eating habits and develop a personalized meal plan to optimize nutrient intake.

Nutrition And Healing

  • Find out how diet and supplements can help you. Receive a private consultation along with an individualized nutrition and supplement plan specific to your health concerns.

Comprehensive Weight Control

  • A personalized weight loss program that includes a consultation along with nutrition education, behavior modification and an individualized eating program which maximizes energy and eliminates food cravings.

Presurgical Evaluations

  • An individualized plan which optimizes health prior to surgery and facilitates healing after surgery.

Optimal Health And Wellness Evaluations

  • A comprehensive evaluation of all the body’s intricate organ systems along with supplement recommendations to improve overall health.

Health Questionnaire Analysis

See more at this link:   Meta-eHealth.

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Unrelated To Lighten things up…

Many US states now cover medical nutrition therapy under Medicaid/Medicare – making dietetics a more lucrative profession

Nutrition

Nutrition (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I thought you might find the following interesting (policy changes are making having an RD more lucrative):  

 

Consultant dietitians

Consultant dietitian is a term sometimes used to describe dietitians who work under contract with health care facilities or in private practice, such as used in Canada and the United States.[2][7] The term ‘consultant’ in this case should not be confused with the identical title reserved for certain medical doctors in countries such as the United Kingdom and Ireland. Consultant dietitians contract independently to provide nutrition services and educational programs to individuals and health care facilities as well as sports teams, fitness clubs, supermarkets, and other health and nutrition-related businesses.

Required qualifications and professional associations

In most countries, competent performance as a dietitian requires formal training at a higher educational institution in food and nutritional science, nutrition education, dietetics, or a related field.[1] Their education in health science involves scientific based knowledge in anatomychemistrybiochemistrybiology, and physiology.

While the specific academic and professional requirements to becoming a fully qualified dietitian differ across countries and jurisdictions, as these are adapted to the needs of the individual countries and the opportunities available,[8] common academic routes include:

In addition, dietitians may be required to undergo an internship to learn counseling skills and aspects of psychology. The internship process differs across countries and jurisdictions.

Associations for dietetics professionals exist in many countries on every continent.[8]

United States

In the United States, nutrition professionals include the dietitian or registered dietitian (RD), as well as “dietetic technician” or “dietetic technician, registered” (DTR) (see below). These terms are legally protected, regulated by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) which registers and confers professional credentials. The ADA also recognizes and certifies certain specialty areas, such as in Gerontological Nutrition.[17]

Dietitians are registered with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (the certifying agency of the ADA) and are only able to use the label “Registered Dietitian” when they have met specific educational and professional prerequisites and passed a national registration examination. Besides academic education, dietitians must complete at least 1200 hours of practical, supervised experience through an accredited program before they can sit for the registration examination. In a coordinated program, students acquire internship hours concurrently with their coursework. In a didactic program, these hours are obtained through a dietetic internship that is completed after obtaining a degree.[18] In both programs the student is required to complete several areas of competency including rotations in clinical, community, long-term care nutrition as well as food service, public health and a variety of other worksites.

Once the degree is earned, the internship completed, and registration examination passed, the individual can now use the nationally recognized legal title, “Registered Dietitian”, and is able to work in a variety of professional settings. To maintain the RD credential, professionals must participate in and earn continuing education units (often 75 hours every 5 years).

In addition, many states require specific licensure to work in most settings. For instance, the California Business and Professions Code Section 2585-2586.8,[19] states that:

Any person representing himself or herself as a registered dietitian shall meet one of the following qualifications:

  1. Been granted, prior to January 1, 1981, the right to use the term “registered dietitian” by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services as qualified to grant the title, provided that person continues to meet all requirements and qualifications periodically prescribed by the agency or institution for the maintenance of that title.
  2. Possess all of the following qualifications:
(A) Be 18 years of age or older.
(B) Satisfactory completion of appropriate academic requirements for the field of dietetics and related disciplines and receipt of a baccalaureate or higher degree from a college or university accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges or other regional accreditation agency.
(C) Satisfactory completion of a program of supervised practice for a minimum of 900 hours that is designed to prepare entry level practitioners through instruction and assignments in a clinical setting. Supervisors of the program shall meet minimum qualifications established by public or private agencies or institutions recognized by the State Department of Health Services to establish those qualifications.
(D) Satisfactory completion of an examination administered by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services as qualified to administer the examinations.
(E) Satisfactory completion of continuing education requirements established by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services to establish the requirements.

In addition: It is a misdemeanor for any person not meeting the criteria… in connection with his or her name or place of business, the words “dietetic technician, registered,” “dietitian,” “dietician,” “registered dietitian,” “registered dietician,” or the letters “RD,” “DTR,” or any other words, letters, abbreviations, or insignia indicating or implying that the person is a dietitian, or dietetic technician, registered or registered dietitian, or to represent, in any way, orally, in writing, in print or by sign, directly or by implication, that he or she is a dietitian or a dietetic technician, registered or a registered dietitian.[19]

As recent studies have shown the importance of diet in both disease prevention and management, many US states have moved towards covering medical nutrition therapy under theMedicaid/Medicare social insurance programs, making dietetics a much more lucrative profession due to insurance reimbursement.

HANDOUT: FOOD SAFETY FOR OLDER ADULTS

Template for Template:Food safety

HANDOUT: FOOD SAFETY FOR OLDER ADULTS...Use to enhance your nutrition practice.

Dietary consultants may want to use this Handout (PDF) to enhance their practice. You can post it on your website or blog and give to your clients:

TO Older Adults:  this 19 page booklet is designed to provide practical guidance on how to reduce your risk of foodborne illness. In addition to this practical guidance, we encourage you to check with your physician or health care provider to identify food and other products that you should avoid.

Work with your dietitian to choose the right foods for you.

Click here for the download page

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