Posts Tagged ‘American Dietetic Association’

Found a list of Dietetic Internships: for International Food, Nutrition and Dietetics Professionals

Nutrition

Here is a reference for dietetics professionals that describes Didactic, Coordinated, Dietetic Technician, Dietetic Internships and other programs that have international collaborations with over 50 foreign locations. Made possible through the Wimpfheimer-Guggenheim Fund for International Exchange in Nutrition, Dietetics and Management…

Click here for the download page

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To help your clients who are vegetarian or learning about it: Nutrition During Pregnancy for Vegetarians…the different types of vegetarians ranging from Vegan to Pescatarian – to goals for healthy eating

vegan food pyramid adapted from recommendation...

Vegan food pyramid adapted from recommendations made in "A new food guide for North American vegetarians" (2003) from the American Dietetic Association (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Explains the different types of vegetarians from vegan to Pescatarian to goals for healthy eating

Click here for:  Nutrition During Pregnancy for Vegetarians

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Unrelated to lighten things up…

Many US states now cover medical nutrition therapy under Medicaid/Medicare – making dietetics a more lucrative profession

Nutrition

Nutrition (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I thought you might find the following interesting (policy changes are making having an RD more lucrative):  

 

Consultant dietitians

Consultant dietitian is a term sometimes used to describe dietitians who work under contract with health care facilities or in private practice, such as used in Canada and the United States.[2][7] The term ‘consultant’ in this case should not be confused with the identical title reserved for certain medical doctors in countries such as the United Kingdom and Ireland. Consultant dietitians contract independently to provide nutrition services and educational programs to individuals and health care facilities as well as sports teams, fitness clubs, supermarkets, and other health and nutrition-related businesses.

Required qualifications and professional associations

In most countries, competent performance as a dietitian requires formal training at a higher educational institution in food and nutritional science, nutrition education, dietetics, or a related field.[1] Their education in health science involves scientific based knowledge in anatomychemistrybiochemistrybiology, and physiology.

While the specific academic and professional requirements to becoming a fully qualified dietitian differ across countries and jurisdictions, as these are adapted to the needs of the individual countries and the opportunities available,[8] common academic routes include:

In addition, dietitians may be required to undergo an internship to learn counseling skills and aspects of psychology. The internship process differs across countries and jurisdictions.

Associations for dietetics professionals exist in many countries on every continent.[8]

United States

In the United States, nutrition professionals include the dietitian or registered dietitian (RD), as well as “dietetic technician” or “dietetic technician, registered” (DTR) (see below). These terms are legally protected, regulated by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) which registers and confers professional credentials. The ADA also recognizes and certifies certain specialty areas, such as in Gerontological Nutrition.[17]

Dietitians are registered with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (the certifying agency of the ADA) and are only able to use the label “Registered Dietitian” when they have met specific educational and professional prerequisites and passed a national registration examination. Besides academic education, dietitians must complete at least 1200 hours of practical, supervised experience through an accredited program before they can sit for the registration examination. In a coordinated program, students acquire internship hours concurrently with their coursework. In a didactic program, these hours are obtained through a dietetic internship that is completed after obtaining a degree.[18] In both programs the student is required to complete several areas of competency including rotations in clinical, community, long-term care nutrition as well as food service, public health and a variety of other worksites.

Once the degree is earned, the internship completed, and registration examination passed, the individual can now use the nationally recognized legal title, “Registered Dietitian”, and is able to work in a variety of professional settings. To maintain the RD credential, professionals must participate in and earn continuing education units (often 75 hours every 5 years).

In addition, many states require specific licensure to work in most settings. For instance, the California Business and Professions Code Section 2585-2586.8,[19] states that:

Any person representing himself or herself as a registered dietitian shall meet one of the following qualifications:

  1. Been granted, prior to January 1, 1981, the right to use the term “registered dietitian” by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services as qualified to grant the title, provided that person continues to meet all requirements and qualifications periodically prescribed by the agency or institution for the maintenance of that title.
  2. Possess all of the following qualifications:
(A) Be 18 years of age or older.
(B) Satisfactory completion of appropriate academic requirements for the field of dietetics and related disciplines and receipt of a baccalaureate or higher degree from a college or university accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges or other regional accreditation agency.
(C) Satisfactory completion of a program of supervised practice for a minimum of 900 hours that is designed to prepare entry level practitioners through instruction and assignments in a clinical setting. Supervisors of the program shall meet minimum qualifications established by public or private agencies or institutions recognized by the State Department of Health Services to establish those qualifications.
(D) Satisfactory completion of an examination administered by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services as qualified to administer the examinations.
(E) Satisfactory completion of continuing education requirements established by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services to establish the requirements.

In addition: It is a misdemeanor for any person not meeting the criteria… in connection with his or her name or place of business, the words “dietetic technician, registered,” “dietitian,” “dietician,” “registered dietitian,” “registered dietician,” or the letters “RD,” “DTR,” or any other words, letters, abbreviations, or insignia indicating or implying that the person is a dietitian, or dietetic technician, registered or registered dietitian, or to represent, in any way, orally, in writing, in print or by sign, directly or by implication, that he or she is a dietitian or a dietetic technician, registered or a registered dietitian.[19]

As recent studies have shown the importance of diet in both disease prevention and management, many US states have moved towards covering medical nutrition therapy under theMedicaid/Medicare social insurance programs, making dietetics a much more lucrative profession due to insurance reimbursement.

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