Posts Tagged ‘medicine’

Our New Focus…

Moving forward, we will try to find, or create, free versions of fee-based resources (such as brochures, tools, and books) for dietitians – to help them out.   We will provide links to both versions in case either can be helpful.

We hope this research is helpful and best wishes for your success.

Sincerely,

John and Celeste Hudson

(authors of this blog and CelesteHealthyLiving.com)

Just finished new BOOK: “Vegetarian and Vegan – An Introduction” (267 pgs)

Food for Life distributes food on an internati...

Celeste Healthy Living - BOOK: Vegetarian & Vegan - An Introduction (267 PGS)

April 26, 2012:
BOOK: VEGETARIAN & VEGAN – AN INTRODUCTION” (267 pgs) click here.

Editor: Celeste Hudson, MBA, PhD

Preface

There is a growing trend toward being vegan or vegetarian. Famous vegan personalities are featured by the media, like Bill Clinton, casino mogul Steve Wynn, Pamela Anderson, Shania Twain, William Shatner. Many recognizable celebrities, past and present, have chosen this lifestyle – Ellen, Deepak Chopra, Albert Einstein, Gloria Steinem, Bob Marley, Mark Twain, Leonardo da Vinci, Charles Darwin, Alec Baldwin, Benjamin Franklin, Mike Tyson, Plato, Socrates, Twitter Co-Founder Biz Stone, Pink and Michael J. Fox.

Proof of the trend can be found in grocery stores. Where Heinz used to be the only vegetarian baked beans available, now there are several on the shelf, there are aisles or entire stores dedicated to organic, vegan and vegetarian foods. Businesses supply what customers want – a recent Gallup Poll reported that 20% of the population looks for a restaurant with vegetarian items, a third of the public would order non-meat items if they were listed on the menu. This 20-30% has changed businesses’ and health care professionals’ need to add vegetarian items to menus or address this choice when offering patient care.

It is the position of The American Dietetic Association (ADA) that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases.

Included in this book are the Basics, Trends and Resources that show how scientific data suggest positive relationships between a vegetarian diet and reduced risk for several chronic degenerative diseases and conditions, including obesity, coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and some types of cancer. Enjoy.

Sincerely,

Celeste Hudson, MBA, PhD

Celeste Healthy Living – BOOK: Vegetarian & Vegan – An Introduction (267 PGS)

Dietitians and Nutritionists : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Cover of the 2006-2007 Occupational Outlook Ha...

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: Occupational Outlook Handbook (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A good link for seeing the potential in this field from the government’s perspective i.e. “Employment of dietitians and nutritionists is expected to increase 20 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations.”

Click here for:  Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics on Dietitians and Nutritionists.

37 Key Indicators: A good set of tools for learning the senior marketplace and/or educate your senior clients…

Nations with Universal health care systems. Na...

Orange=Nations with some type of universal health care system. Yellow=Nations attempting to obtain universal health care. Brown=Health care coverage provided by the United States war funding. Gray=Nations with no universal health care.

The following link provides the latest data on 37 key indicators to portray aspects of the lives of older Americans and their families. It is divided into five subject areas: population, economics, health status, health risks and behaviors, and health care.

Click here for:  Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics

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Unrelated to lighten things up…

A small fyi on snow shoveling:  Coat the blade of your snow shovel with cooking spray.  That way the snow and ice will slide off the shovel instead of sticking to it. This works for both plastic and metal shovels.

Many US states now cover medical nutrition therapy under Medicaid/Medicare – making dietetics a more lucrative profession

Nutrition

Nutrition (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I thought you might find the following interesting (policy changes are making having an RD more lucrative):  

 

Consultant dietitians

Consultant dietitian is a term sometimes used to describe dietitians who work under contract with health care facilities or in private practice, such as used in Canada and the United States.[2][7] The term ‘consultant’ in this case should not be confused with the identical title reserved for certain medical doctors in countries such as the United Kingdom and Ireland. Consultant dietitians contract independently to provide nutrition services and educational programs to individuals and health care facilities as well as sports teams, fitness clubs, supermarkets, and other health and nutrition-related businesses.

Required qualifications and professional associations

In most countries, competent performance as a dietitian requires formal training at a higher educational institution in food and nutritional science, nutrition education, dietetics, or a related field.[1] Their education in health science involves scientific based knowledge in anatomychemistrybiochemistrybiology, and physiology.

While the specific academic and professional requirements to becoming a fully qualified dietitian differ across countries and jurisdictions, as these are adapted to the needs of the individual countries and the opportunities available,[8] common academic routes include:

In addition, dietitians may be required to undergo an internship to learn counseling skills and aspects of psychology. The internship process differs across countries and jurisdictions.

Associations for dietetics professionals exist in many countries on every continent.[8]

United States

In the United States, nutrition professionals include the dietitian or registered dietitian (RD), as well as “dietetic technician” or “dietetic technician, registered” (DTR) (see below). These terms are legally protected, regulated by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) which registers and confers professional credentials. The ADA also recognizes and certifies certain specialty areas, such as in Gerontological Nutrition.[17]

Dietitians are registered with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (the certifying agency of the ADA) and are only able to use the label “Registered Dietitian” when they have met specific educational and professional prerequisites and passed a national registration examination. Besides academic education, dietitians must complete at least 1200 hours of practical, supervised experience through an accredited program before they can sit for the registration examination. In a coordinated program, students acquire internship hours concurrently with their coursework. In a didactic program, these hours are obtained through a dietetic internship that is completed after obtaining a degree.[18] In both programs the student is required to complete several areas of competency including rotations in clinical, community, long-term care nutrition as well as food service, public health and a variety of other worksites.

Once the degree is earned, the internship completed, and registration examination passed, the individual can now use the nationally recognized legal title, “Registered Dietitian”, and is able to work in a variety of professional settings. To maintain the RD credential, professionals must participate in and earn continuing education units (often 75 hours every 5 years).

In addition, many states require specific licensure to work in most settings. For instance, the California Business and Professions Code Section 2585-2586.8,[19] states that:

Any person representing himself or herself as a registered dietitian shall meet one of the following qualifications:

  1. Been granted, prior to January 1, 1981, the right to use the term “registered dietitian” by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services as qualified to grant the title, provided that person continues to meet all requirements and qualifications periodically prescribed by the agency or institution for the maintenance of that title.
  2. Possess all of the following qualifications:
(A) Be 18 years of age or older.
(B) Satisfactory completion of appropriate academic requirements for the field of dietetics and related disciplines and receipt of a baccalaureate or higher degree from a college or university accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges or other regional accreditation agency.
(C) Satisfactory completion of a program of supervised practice for a minimum of 900 hours that is designed to prepare entry level practitioners through instruction and assignments in a clinical setting. Supervisors of the program shall meet minimum qualifications established by public or private agencies or institutions recognized by the State Department of Health Services to establish those qualifications.
(D) Satisfactory completion of an examination administered by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services as qualified to administer the examinations.
(E) Satisfactory completion of continuing education requirements established by a public or private agency or institution recognized by the State Department of Health Services to establish the requirements.

In addition: It is a misdemeanor for any person not meeting the criteria… in connection with his or her name or place of business, the words “dietetic technician, registered,” “dietitian,” “dietician,” “registered dietitian,” “registered dietician,” or the letters “RD,” “DTR,” or any other words, letters, abbreviations, or insignia indicating or implying that the person is a dietitian, or dietetic technician, registered or registered dietitian, or to represent, in any way, orally, in writing, in print or by sign, directly or by implication, that he or she is a dietitian or a dietetic technician, registered or a registered dietitian.[19]

As recent studies have shown the importance of diet in both disease prevention and management, many US states have moved towards covering medical nutrition therapy under theMedicaid/Medicare social insurance programs, making dietetics a much more lucrative profession due to insurance reimbursement.

Finished new, free BOOK that may be helpful when educating your clients to celiac disease: Celiac Disease and Gluten Free Diet (33 pgs)

Biopsy of small bowel showing coeliac disease ...

Biopsy of small bowel showing coeliac disease

My wife Celeste (my smarter half) just finished editing her new book: Celiac Disease & Gluten Free Diet (33 pgs) click here to see Table of Contents and download book. It is the first in our “Take Charge Series” to help those diagnosed with celiac disease. Later editions will focus on other perspectives of the disease and suggested diet.

CelesteHealthyLiving.com

What I need to know about Celiac Disease

Day 125: Just like poison

What I need to know about Celiac Disease

The following is a good resource to learn about celiac disease ranging from what it is to what foods you can still eat, etc.

Celiac disease is an immune disease in which people can’t eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten may also be used in products such as vitamin and nutrient supplements, lip balms, and some medicines. Other names for celiac disease are celiac sprue and gluten intolerance.

Your body’s natural defense system, called the immune system, keeps you healthy by fighting against things that can make you sick, such as bacteria and viruses. When people with celiac disease eat gluten, their body’s immune system reacts to the gluten by attacking the lining of the small intestine. The immune system’s reaction to gluten damages small, fingerlike growths called villi. When the villi are damaged, the body cannot get the nutrients it needs.

Celiac disease is hereditary, meaning it runs in families. Adults and children can have celiac disease. As many as 2 million Americans may have celiac disease, but most don’t know it.

Symptoms of celiac disease can be different from person to person…

Symptoms

The symptoms of celiac disease can be different from person to person. This is part of the reason why the diagnosis is not always made right away. For example, one person may have constipation, a second may have diarrhea, and a third may have no problem with stools.

Gastrointestinal symptoms include:

Because the intestines do not absorb many important vitamins, minerals, and other parts of food, the following symptoms may start over time:

  • Bruising easily
  • Depression or anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Growth delay in children
  • Hair loss
  • Itchy skin (dermatitis herpetiformis)
  • Missed menstrual periods
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Muscle cramps and joint pain
  • Nosebleeds
  • Seizures
  • Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet
  • Unexplained short height

Children with celiac disease may have:

  • Defects in the tooth enamel and changes in tooth color
  • Delayed puberty
  • Diarrhea, constipation, fatty or foul-smelling stools, nausea, or vomiting
  • Irritable and fussy behavior
  • Poor weight gain
  • Slowed growth and shorter than normal height for their age

Signs and tests

  • Albumin (may be low)
  • Alkaline phosphatase (high level may be a sign of bone loss)
  • Clotting factor abnormalities
  • Cholesterol (may be low)
  • Complete blood count (CBC – test for anemia)
  • Liver enzymes (transaminases)
  • Prothrombin time

Blood tests can detect several special antibodies, called antitissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGA) or anti-endomysium antibodies (EMA). The health care provider will order these antibody tests if celiac disease is suspected.

If the tests are positive, upper endoscopy is usually performed to sample a piece of tissue (biopsy) from the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). The biopsy may show a flattening of the villi in the parts of the intestine below the duodenum.

Genetic testing of the blood is also available to help determine who may be at risk for celiac disease.

A follow-up biopsy or blood test may be ordered several months after the diagnosis and treatment. These tests evaluate your response to treatment. Normal results mean that you have responded to treatment, which confirms the diagnosis. However, this does not mean that the disease has been cured.

Treatment

Celiac disease cannot be cured. However, your symptoms will go away and the villi in the lining of the intestines will heal if you follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. Do not eat foods, beverages, and medications that contain wheat, barley, rye, and possibly oats.

You must read food and medication labels carefully to look for hidden sources of these grains and ingredients related to them. Because wheat and barley grains are common in the American diet, sticking with this diet is challenging. With education and planning, you will heal.

You should NOT begin the gluten-free diet before you are diagnosed. Starting the diet will affect testing for the disease.

The health care provider may prescribe vitamin and mineral supplements to correct nutritional deficiencies. Occasionally, corticosteroids (such as prednisone) may also be prescribed for short-term use or if you have sprue that does not respond to treatment. Following a well-balanced, gluten-free diet is generally the only treatment you need to stay well.

When you are diagnosed, get help from a registered dietitian who specializes in celiac disease and the gluten-free diet. A support group may also help you cope with the disease and diet.

Support Groups

For additional information and support, see the organizations listed in celiac disease resources.

Expectations (prognosis)

Following a gluten-free diet heals the damage to the intestines and prevents further damage. This healing most often occurs within 3 – 6 months in children, but it may take 2 – 3 years in adults.

Rarely, long-term damage will be done to the lining of the intestines before the diagnosis is made.

Some problems caused by celiac disease may not improve, such as a shorter than expected height and damage to the teeth.

Complications

You must carefully continue to follow the gluten-free diet. When untreated, the disease can cause life-threatening complications.

Delaying diagnosis or not following the diet puts you at risk for related conditions such as:

Calling your health care provider

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of celiac disease.

Prevention

Because the exact cause is unknown, there is no known way to prevent the development of celiac disease. However, being aware of the risk factors (such as having a family member with the disorder) may increase your chances of early diagnosis, treatment, and a long, healthy life.

Sleep and aging – Snoring is more common among older people and among those that are overweight.

Dietary consultants may want to use this Video to enhance their practice. You can post it on your website or blog and give to your clients. It is titled, VIDEO:  Snoring. What you eat and drink increase or decrease snoring.  Alcohol is probably the number one cause of snoring.  Here are tips.

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