Posts Tagged ‘business’

On-Camera Style – tips that can be useful to anyone with a consulting practice such as dietitians, who suddenly find themselves on camera

An interview for television.

The more I read the following from the author, Rachel Weingarten…  the more her tips of the trade made sense to me, in  today’s “instantly on the spot” world.  She is a regularly featured expert on TV shows including Good Morning America and The Today Show.  These are tips that can be useful to everyone with a consulting practice such as dietitians, who suddenly find themselves on camera.
I especially liked the section, “Craft Your Message”.  Here is her article…It wasn’t too long ago that the only people who appeared on camera were celebrities, sports figures, or other famous folk. In our own media-saturated times, smartphones have video capabilities, networks have almost instantaneous satellite feeds, and video is always accessible from your computer, tablet, or smartphone.Chances are good that you might find yourself on camera sometime soon. “In this day an age, when everyone has a smartphone and access to social media, you have to think of your friends as Paparazzi. Your image can end up on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, etc. – so you should always look your best.” says Jeffrey Pattit, a TV Producer/Casting Director and former PR professional.Because TV & video are so prevalent in our culture, you might need to appear on camera to represent yourself, your brand, or your business. Before you open up your mouth or home to the media and start discussing everything from your family, hobbies, career, or the pink tinted sludge you just ate from your favorite fast food restaurant, you might want to stop and think about the way you look and come across to others.

The right answers, confidence, clothing, and messaging can make the difference between your becoming the next Diane Sawyer or the next reality TV train wreck.

Looking great on camera is crucial, but just being telegenic isn’t enough. Once you’ve figured out your look, you have to create and practice your message and stay on topic in order to exude confidence.

So, what makes you feel confident? Knowing your stuff is a great start, but there’s a reason that companies regularly tout the “look good feel good” ethos. If you look good, chances are high that you’ll hold yourself in a different way, feel better about yourself, and better project your message.

Just because some people seem comfortable and come across as if they were born on camera, does not mean that they actually are. They’re just confident and know the tricks of the trade, some of which include:

Look Good

Rebecca Resnick Driskill, a freelance producer who’s worked with the Sundance Channel, says that the first thing anybody asks is what to wear on TV. She advises avoiding black, white and busy, tight patterns (think tweed, small checks, thin stripes), which can create a ‘moiré’ effect which will seem to vibrate or “do weird things to the camera,” according to film and television director Joshua Seftel, of Queer Eye fame.

Resnick Driskill advises choosing a color that’s flattering on you and with a relatively simple neckline. “Personally, I think turtlenecks, large brooches, exploding ruffles, and too much cleavage are best avoided.”

Seftel says not to assume that there will be a good make-up artist on set. “Be prepared to do your own hair and make-up and bring what you need with you just in case.”

To that end, find a makeup artist you trust and have several trial sessions with, or practice your makeup in advance and have a friend photograph you from several angles and in different lighting. Better yet, have a friend shoot some video of you talking and pay attention not only to how you look, but how you sound and the gestures you make that might be distracting.

Make sure to blot or powder shiny bits and fill in sparse areas, but be mindful of being overzealous with color or powder. While more is better on camera, too much leaves you at a risk for looking ridiculous. “By the time you go on, you should not be worrying about your hair and makeup,” says frequent TV commentator Vera Gibbons.

Jennifer Joseph, a producer at ABC News 20/20 and the Barbara Walters Specials says, “Never stand head on to the camera. Standing at an angle is always more flattering.” Practice your angle though, so that you  don’t look posed or you’ll risk looking silly.

Craft a Message

Mr. Media Training Brad Phillips, creator of the popular Mr. Media Training blog, advises clients to craft three unique messages and to try to steer questions and conversation to one of your three topics. If it’s too hard to create your three strongest messages, Phillips advises writing down everything that you want people to know about you, your book, your organization, or your specialty, and then go back and choose the three that are the most important.

“Your message is your lifeboat, without it you’ll drift. At best, you’ll be treading water, at worst- you’ll drown,” says Phillips. Once you’ve developed your message though, “don’t memorize – internalize.” You don’t want to sound too stiff and if you practice enough, your messages become part of you and each time you’re saying them in a different way.

Sound Good

“Speak distinctly,” advises Nancy Daniels, AKA The Voice Lady, who offers voice training and voice improvement, “there’s no need to rush.” While you’re at it, practice your breathing and try to breathe through your diaphragm.

Daniels believes that most people are guilty of “lazy breathing” and use their throats to push out their voice instead of their chests. “If your throat is doing the work the pitch in your voice goes up and down resulting in a nervous quiver.” The last thing you want to happen when you’re on-camera.

Think Before You Speak

When it comes to live TV, Pattit says that the pressure is high for everyone. “Even hosts and TV anchors sometimes step on other people when they are talking.” Resnick Driskill takes it a step further, “Ignore the camera. Don’t overthink it. And don’t be afraid to take a few seconds (or minutes, if it’s not live TV) to think about what you’re going to say, before you say it. You won’t regret it.”

Be Passionate and Authentic

You have to be genuinely excited about your message, according to Phillips. “Even if you stumble or say it inelegantly, make sure you’re excited about your topic. Your genuine enthusiasm comes through.”

For a confidence boosting exercise, Phillips also suggests “thinking about the person you are when out with friends. You avoid being too slick if you’re presenting the most authentic version of yourself.” For an extra confidence boost, Pattit advises sitting on the front third of your chair which helps you to avoid slouching.

Dress for Your Shape

Gibbons recommends taking things down a size when on camera or opting for fitted clothing. “It’s true what they say – the camera adds 10 pounds, so if you’re wearing something loose and baggy, you are going to look HUGE.”

Pattit believes that the same rules apply for everyday life as they do for on-camera appearances. “Dress for your body type. No matter your size, big or small, learn to wear clothes that flatter your figure and accentuate the positives.”

Keep Calm and Carry On

Pattit says that staying calm and really knowing your message will help you avoid tripping up on camera. “Make sure you know your talking points. However, don’t take yourself so seriously – everyone makes mistakes and owning up to them is the best advice I can give to anyone.”

If you say something wrong, Pattit advises making sure you not only excuse yourself, but make sure you get out the right message before moving onto another subject.

And if All Else Fails

“Smile,” says Gibbons. “No matter what you’re wearing or how you look, if you’re not smiling on the air, or otherwise having fun, it’s not going to work.”

Rachel Weingarten is a style expert, marketing strategist & personal branding consultant for CEOs, politicians and celebrities and the creator of MintStyle. She is the award-winning author of Career and Corporate Cool and Hello Gorgeous! Beauty Products in America ‘40s-‘60s. Rachel writes for top media outlets including CNN, Fortune, Forbes Life, MSN, USA Today, Yahoo Finance and many others. She is a regularly featured expert on TV shows including Good Morning America and The Today Show. Visit her online at http://racheletc.com 

Unrelated to nutrition, but interesting: which states are back to normal real estate prices

I thought this was interesting (we live in NY) and wanted to share it:  National Association of Home Builders Remains Optimistic About Housing Recovery

Posted: 27 Apr 2012 08:27 AM PDT

Recovery, by state“In its latest construction forecast, the NAHB on Wednesday stuck to its guns that “underlying fundamentals” such as low mortgage rates, decent economic growth, and pent–up demand for housing will drive double–digit percentage increases in home starts this year and next, and reverse catastrophic declines in new and existing home sales.”

 

 

Twitter Tips for Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists

Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...

Ideas For Dietitians and Nutritionists

TO:  Registered Dietitians:  How much can you say in 140 characters?  A lot — and often.  Just ask the millions of Twitter users worldwide.

Large and small consulting practices: such as Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists are aggressively growing their Twitter presence to communicate directly with their current clients, alliance partners, investors, employees and potential clients.

In response, Dietitians are creating profiles that showcase their expertise, opinions and character:  to attract relationships with potential alliance partners, clients, industry gurus, etc.

Not too late to start:  If you’ve been tweeting since the early days of Twitter, congratulations — you have cultivated a substantial digital asset for yourself. If you’re just starting out or you’ve abandoned your account, the good news is that it’s never too late to start.

The best day to begin (again) is today. Twitter is forgiving like that. Here’s how to get going and stay going:

1. Set up your account. Twitter profiles are very simple to create and update. The essential elements are:

  • @name: Select a name for your account that’s distinct and professional. If possible, use some form of your real name.
  • Image: Post an image that is a clean and appropriate — a quality headshot, an artistic avatar, a logo or an image that suits your line of business. Do not use the generic Twitter image.
  • Description: Write a 160-character overview of who you are and what you tweet about. Most professionals list their role, or company, and then what they are passionate about as space permits.  The passionate part is what your audience will sense and remember.
  • Background Design: Choose a background design and image that complements your stated profile. Twitter supplies templates in the Design section of your account page and there are paid Twitter background apps available on the Internet with a wide variety of selection and price.  Typically the more expensive a product or service…the more conservative you will want to be.  A conservative image enhances first impressions and trust…especially in today’s hyper competitive markets.

2. Go mobile. Be prepared to participate by downloading the mobile version of Twitter. The platform is best enjoyed and maximized on the go. Twitter is available for iPhone, Android, and Blackberry users on their respective app stores. The functionality is incredibly good on mobile and easily recognizable from the desktop version. Many find Twitter to have transformed networking at trade shows and conferences with its simplicity of finding people, getting session feeds and tracking down event locations.

3. Give to get and learn the lingo. Twitter enables and encourages you to interact — it has distinct terminology and functionality. The sooner you learn the lingo the sooner you can reap benefits. In your initial days and weeks of engagement, focus on mastering the technology and publishing roughly 1 to 3 tweets daily.  Very important is:  you MUST provide value in every tweet.  This is especially important when using Twitter in your professional marketing efforts.  Remember that every communication…via any format (Twitter, email, in-person, etc.) is like an interview…your audience is always evaluating your potential “value add” to them…for their current or future initiatives.

Some Twitter Terminology:

Twitter terms definitions

Tip:  The best tweet content for earning new clients for your nutrition practice are those which demonstrate your knowledge and skills.  Use hashtags (#) before keywords to identify the subject matter or important aspects of your message that may not be used in the words in your tweet.  For example, if you’re offering tips on when to consult with a nutritionist, you can use the hashtags #nutrition and #allergy and #dietitian. That way, if others are searching for tweets about nutrition, they can find your tweet.

4. Focus on Your Target Market. Beyond tweeting with hashtags, your next priority is to wisely select followers to grab their attention. For example, if you are trying to gain corporate clients… i.e. to provide “Lunch and Learn” Nutrition Seminars to the employees (prospective clients) of the large firms in your area…then target HR managers and Corporate Communication managers that tweet about the company’s committment to their employees, community, what’s happening at the company, and industry trends. Use their tweets to learn their potential needs and to be relevant.  Learn about their corporate culture.  Read their tweets, list or favorite them, and retweet their most relevant tweets.  Help them.  If they follow you back, you then have the opportunity to send them a Direct Message of 140 characters. Learn to introduce yourself and ask for what you want (the value you can provide) succinctly.

5. Know the Etiquette. In your first level of proficiency with Twitter, keep these rules in mind:

  1. Remember that tweets live forever and are spread at the speed of light.
  2. Don’t hog your knowledge — Twitter demands sharing and interaction.
  3. Balance the quantity and quality of your tweets.
  4. “Follow back” someone who follows you as appropriate.
  5. Participate in real-time to get real results.

Best wishes for your success.

John Hudson   About

Infographic: The Best Ways to Spend Your Tax Refund (an interesting “Decision Tree” on what to do with the refund)

This is unrelated to the usual nutrition blog, but I thought this was an interesting “Decision Tree” on what to do with tax refunds.  They say the average refund is $2948.

Click here for infographic: The Best Ways to Spend Your Tax Refund

Resource Summary to help seniors… ranging from Insurance to What You Can Do to Prevent Falls.

Senior Citizens in New Ulm, Minnesota, Making ...

(Photo credit: The U.S. National Archives)

A good summary of resources to help senior citizens – many topics ranging from insurance to what you can do to prevent falls.

Click here for the Resource Summary for Seniors

———–

Unrelated To lighten things up…

37 Key Indicators: A good set of tools for learning the senior marketplace and/or educate your senior clients…

Nations with Universal health care systems. Na...

Orange=Nations with some type of universal health care system. Yellow=Nations attempting to obtain universal health care. Brown=Health care coverage provided by the United States war funding. Gray=Nations with no universal health care.

The following link provides the latest data on 37 key indicators to portray aspects of the lives of older Americans and their families. It is divided into five subject areas: population, economics, health status, health risks and behaviors, and health care.

Click here for:  Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics

————–

Unrelated to lighten things up…

A small fyi on snow shoveling:  Coat the blade of your snow shovel with cooking spray.  That way the snow and ice will slide off the shovel instead of sticking to it. This works for both plastic and metal shovels.

For Registered Dietitians: Creating a Business and Marketing Plan — 10 Steps to Success

Marketing Plan

Creating a Marketing Plan is An Important First Step

 

Here are other good recommendations for new Registered Dieticians who are just getting started:

Dietitians may resist writing a business and marketing plan for a number of reasons, including fear of committing to an idea, lack of understanding the concept and the need for a business and marketing plan, and lack of interest in turning ideas into action.

But creating a plan is the first key to success… see this link for more detail: Creating a Business and Marketing Plan — 10 Steps to Success.

%d bloggers like this: